These Are The Sexual Activities Most Likely To Cause Injury, According To Science

People do die having sex; if they don’t, they can get severely injured. This is something that’s notoriously difficult to categorize or rank, though.

The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) lets you see how many people in the US have died from “exposure to sunlight”, so it caters to vampires, but the closest we can find to sex-based injury appears to be the very ambiguous “overexertion from repetitive movements” and “exposure to vibration.”

Even the estimates for death via sex-induced heart attacks vary wildly. One places the number at around 11,000 victims in the US alone – mostly elderly men, it seems. Another suggests that the number is far lower, in the tens or hundreds of people per annum.

Ladies and gentlemen, this is nothing short of a logistical nightmare. The best we can do is rank sexual acts in terms of number of accidental injuries they are related to.

So, in ascending order – and leaving out some of the more (ahem) imaginative forms of reaching that naughty nirvana – here are the most inadvertently dangerous sex acts, according to science.

6 – Oral Sex

Again, this is difficult to verify, but there are very few studies or reported cases on accidental injuries as a result of oral sex.

You can imagine that there’s a fair few, of course – words like “blowjob” could be wildly misinterpreted – but whether it’s fellatio or cunnilingus, the risk of inadvertent injury is insignificant. You’re more likely to injure yourself if you engage in autofellatio, which has been known to cause a handful of spinal injuries.

Ick. Tetiana Volkonska/Shutterstock

5 – Use of Sex Toys or Objects

The problem with trying to rank this is that sex toys come in very different shapes, sizes, and types. There’s no single category for “injury via sex toy” in any scientific study we can find.

One analysis, in the journal Sexual Medicine Reviews, notes that “urethrovesical foreign bodies result mainly from sexual or autoeroticism practices and need individualized management.” This means that objects inserted into the urethra, which often cause considerable harm, are so diverse that each treatment is unique to the situation.

As there’s simply not enough data available, we’re going to make a reasonable assumption that this is more dangerous than oral sex, but not as risky as adventures involving an actual penis.

4 – Cowgirl

Yes, vaginal tearing is awful and does happen, but accidental injuries of this kind are rare. The vulva and vagina are relatively hardy – after all, babies are a lot more traumatic than penises are, in general, and they survive that.

The penis itself, however, is extremely prone to fracturing, and while uncommon, the incidence of this coitus-based catastrophe taking place is probably being underestimated. As noted by a study in the International Journal of Impotence Research, “some patients may be too embarrassed to seek medical attention from emergency rooms.”

Several studies have attempted to rank various sexual positions over the years, generally focusing on the risk of penile fracture, or PF. The aforementioned study, which came out just this year, found that in terms of surgically identified PF injuries, cowgirl was the least risky sexual position, accounting for 10 percent of cases.

3 – Masturbation (and general hand-to-genital contact)

Snap. jannoon028/Shutterstock

Masturbation is certainly one way to cause injury to the penis, particularly if it’s overzealous. Yes, if you get creative you may get something wedged into your vagina that can cause lacerations, but again, you can only bend a penis so far before you hear a terrible, gut-wrenching pop, followed often by a crimson fountain.

In this sense, “penile manipulation” – which, granted, also involves tucking in your tiny soldier into your trousers and other such tasks – accounts for 18 percent of all cases of PF, according to the same study.

Incidentally, according to the authors, in “Eastern countries, there is a higher incidence of cases associated with penile manipulation,” specifically the kind designed to force your willy to wilt.

“As many patients believe that the penis has a bone structure or cartilage, and that these are responsible for erections, they may try to manipulate their penises and make them snap – like fingers,” they note. Blimey.

2 – Missionary

The same study places missionary next, which leads to PF in 26 percent of cases. They suspect that, unlike any woman-on-top positions, the more frequently vigorous nature of the male-dominated sexual activity leads to a “great impact at the time of trauma” when the penis slips out for a brief moment.

1 – Doggy Style (in general)

Regardless of gender, and regardless of the, er, entry point, doggy style seems to result in the majority of PF, for the same reasons as described above. This study suggests it is responsible for 41 percent of all PFs.

At this point, a caveat is required. Another study from 2014, one that examined causes of PF using similar methods, came to very different conclusions.

Writing in the journal Advances in Urology, the team found that woman-on-top was the most dangerous (50 percent of PFs), followed by doggy style (29 percent). Penile manipulation was attributed to 14 percent of all PFs.

Unlike the more recent research, these academics argue that when the woman is on top, with her full weight on the penis, it’s harder to stop sex if an injury is about to occur.

In any case, it’s difficult to know which study is more accurate, but both rank doggy style quite highly. So, on average, it’s probably the most risky activity overall.

Risky business. Haoka/Shutterstock

Incidentally, in both studies, heterosexual intercourse appears to be far riskier in terms of PF than homosexual intercourse.

Heterosexual doggy style, for example, was 10 times more likely to result in PF than the homosexual equivalent, according to the 2017 study. The 2014 study reports that 10 percent of PF patients were homosexual, and 67 percent were heterosexual. Both studies involve small data sets, so it’s difficult to know how applicable to the wider world these figures are.

Bonus Round – Fisting

This is described by a review study in the Journal of Forensic and Legal Medicine as “an uncommon and potentially dangerous sexual practice,” one that is “usually a homosexual activity, but can also be a heterosexual or an autoerotic practice.”

Based on the findings of 14 separate peer-reviewed studies, external anal and/or genital trauma is observed in 22.2 percent of cases – a greater than one-in-five chance. Internal injuries, on the other hand, were found in the “totality” of patients. We’d argue, then, that this is the most dangerous and near-conventional sexual activity, because some form of injury will always occur.

This, of course, depends on whether you think damage to the vagina or rectum is worse than a penile fracture. Argue among yourselves.

Read more: http://www.iflscience.com/health-and-medicine/these-are-the-sexual-activities-most-likely-to-cause-injury-according-to-science/

This Is How Youll Fall In Love In 2018, Based On Your Birth Month

Marcelo Matarazzo

January

Your ambition and your strong work ethic are two of your best characteristics, but the way you’ll fall in love in 2018 is by meeting someone who reminds you that there is so much life to be lived  of work. They’ll be 100% supportive of your career and your goals, and will only cheer you on rather than getting in your way – but they will also remind you that it’s important to look up from your screen, open your eyes, experience the world around you, and remember that work is important, but so are things like family, friendships, self-care, joy, and silliness.

February

You will fall in love unexpectedly – with a person you were never initially into but who, with a relaxed confidence, slowly garnered your interest. It will be someone who enjoyed your bright and sparkling disposition from the start, but who also challenged you to open up further for once, and encouraged you to not be afraid to let go and simply let yourself fall.

March

You’ll fall in love in 2018 when you meet someone who finally takes care of you for once. You’re always the one putting everybody first, taking care of everyone else, and never using a spare moment to think about yourself or to prioritize your own needs. So when you meet that person who sees you as someone they want to make happy and take care of and do things for – instead of looking at you as what you can do for them – you’re going to fall hard, and you’re going to fall fast.

April

As someone who is really in tune with your own emotions and of what you want, you’re going to find yourself in a relationship with someone who makes you feel like you no longer have to apologize for having strong feelings. In the past, you’ve always felt a little self-conscious of how open and certain you were about yourself and your wants, but in 2018, you’ll finally find yourself with someone who loves that about you, and who makes you feel more like yourself than you ever have with anyone else.

May

As someone who is highly motivated, focused, and constantly on the go, you always have a list a mile long of things you want to do, places you want to travel, goals you want to accomplish. But in 2018, you’re going to fall in love with someone who actually decreases your restlessness, instead of making it worse. In the past, you’ve always felt weighed down or held back by significant others – worrying that they’re going to keep you from moving forward or distract you from your goals. But this person is going to be the one who finally makes you feel like you have both – like you can be your own version of ‘settled down’ where you’re in love and have a partner and are incredibly happy, while still growing and challenging yourself and pursuing new things every day.

June

In 2018, you’ll finally find yourself in that relationship you’ve always wanted – with the person who is sensitive and loving and gentle, without ever making you feel bored or disinterested or antsy. They’re going to be someone who understands that despite your great sense of humor, you can also be really sensitive and feel hurt very easily; and they’re going to be someone who makes you feel like you could talk to them about absolutely anything without the conversation ever growing dull or colorless.

July

As friendly and magnetic as you are, and as effortlessly as you make friends, you actually have a very hard time opening up and making yourself available for romantic relationships. So in 2018, the way you’ll fall in love is by meeting someone you never expected to fall for – but who ends up totally fascinating you with their ability to make you feel instantly comfortable and to only ever feel energized and invigorated around them (rather than exhausted or socially tired).

August

You will end up with a person who actually stands up to you and doesn’t let you get away with everything. They will understand that you have a natural lean towards leadership and confidence, and they will both love this and respect it; but they will also call you out when you need to be called out, and they will stand up for themselves, and they will always make sure the relationship is 50-50 rather than allowing it to be something where you run the show.

September

In 2018, you will fall in love with someone who makes you more emotional than you’ve ever been with anyone else (but in a way). In the past, your sense of self-preservation has lead you to be detached from and/or critical of your significant others – always subconsciously looking for ways to chase them away before you have a chance to truly get attached. But in 2018, you’ll fall for someone who makes you willing to take risks and makes you to not be afraid of your own feelings – because being with them will wake you up and make you feel so alive.

October

As someone who is very self-possessed and has a health sense of self-esteem, you will find yourself with someone who only makes you feel more and more like yourself, instead of making you feel like you’re losing your sense of self by being with them. They will encourage you to do your own thing, to have your own life outside of them, and to figure out how the two of you can be a team together while also putting in time to figure out who you are as individuals.

November

In 2018, you will fall in love with a person who truly feels on your level. You’ve always had a fast mind with a lot of ideas, and have struggled in the past to learn how to let another person in because you’ve been protective of your sense of self. But this person will finally feel like someone who can keep up with you – somebody who can handle your energy, who gets you without you having to explain yourself, and who fully loves you without being dependent and totally reliant on you.

December

In the new year, you will fall in love with a person who bursts through your tendency to think and love in a very controlled and logical way – and someone who turns your world upside down in the best way. They will adore your sense of humor and will always give you the space you need, but they will also show you how to live in the moment, they will never be intimidated by your temper, and they will show you how to think with your gut and your heart instead of only relying on your brain.

Read more: https://thoughtcatalog.com/sophie-wrenfield/2017/11/this-is-how-youll-fall-in-love-in-2018-based-on-your-birth-month/

The Speculum Finally Gets a Modern Redesign

It was afternoon in the San Francisco headquarters of Frog, the design firm best known for its hand in creating the iconic look of products like Apple's original Macintosh computers. Hailey Stewart, one of Frog's industrial designers, had scattered an array of prototypes on a table. On one end, you could see cylinders of foam that looked almost like skinny vibrators, with handles that stuck out at different angles and sketches of levers and screw mechanisms. And on the other, the common speculum—the device used in routine gynecological exams to inspect the cervix. Stewart picked one up and cranked it open. "You're literally in the stirrups with that sound"—the device made a loud, painful sounding click—"and it's like, excuse my language, but what the fuck?"

Most of the designers in the room had never seen a speculum before. Some (the men) had never considered the contents of a pelvic examination—stripping off your clothes, laying on an examination table, and strapping your feet into stirrups, while a doctor pries you open with a cold, metal gadget. But Stewart hadn't gathered her colleagues just to explain what happens to women at their annual exams. She had a greater goal in mind.

For the past several months, mostly during down time and on weekends, Stewart and interaction designer Sahana Kumar had been studying this device. They'd wrenched it open and closed, studied the curve of the bills, read endlessly about its history. And now, she told the rest of the designers at Frog, they had taken on what was turning into a particularly ambitious project: redesigning the speculum for the 21st century.

The current design of the speculum, fashioned by American physician James Marion Sims, dates back to the 1840s. The device had two pewter blades to separate the vaginal walls, and hinged open and closed with a screw mechanism. Sims, sometimes called the "father of modern gynecology," used the speculum to pioneer treatments for fistula and other complications from childbirth. But his experiments were often conducted on slave women, without the use of anesthesia. So to say that the speculum was not designed with patient comfort in mind would be an egregious understatement.

And yet, the speculum today looks almost identical to the one Sims used more than 150 years ago. The most noticeable difference between the original Sims device and the one you can find in gynecological offices today is that instead of pewter, modern specula are made of stainless steel or plastic.

That the speculum is old is not, on its face, a problem. It's that the design is neither optimal for patients nor physicians. Doctors have to stretch the speculum's bills wide in order to see as far back as the cervix, and even then, it's not always possible to get a good look inside. (Some specula come with built-in lights, but the problem has more to do with tissue falling in than the darkness of the vaginal canal.) All of that pressure causes discomfort; one review of the medical literature found that some women even avoid the gynecologist because of the dreaded device.

Mercy Asiedu

In 2014, the American College of Physicians went so far as to recommend against pelvic exams, citing the "harms, fear, anxiety, embarrassment, pain, and discomfort" associated with speculum examinations. Those side effects impact gynecologists, too. "The more comfortable a patient is, the faster they can do their job, the more patients they can see," says Stewart. "There's actual monetary value to [patient] comfort."

It’s not that nobody’s tried to change things. In 2005, a San Francisco-based company patented the design for an inflatable speculum called FemSpec. The device was made out of polyurethane, the same material used to make condoms; a physician could insert it like a tampon and inflate it like a tiny balloon. It debuted to some fanfare, but ultimately flopped. As an article in The Chicago Times pointed out, most women never even got to experience the new speculum "because it is so new on the market that most doctors aren't using it."

"With a speculum, you just shove it in and expand it as wide as you want to get the visualization you want. With this, you have to put it in and gently move it around, kind of like a joystick." — Biomedical engineer Mercy Asiedu

Other do-overs have focused on more modest improvements. A prototype called the Lotus, created by a student at the Pratt Institute, kept the bill shape but curved it slightly for a more ergonomic insertion. The design also included a rotating handle to open the speculum bills vertically, and a hidden lever mechanism to prevent pinching. It seemed promising, but after appearing in a student showcase last year, it never turned into anything real.

In Oregon, a group called Ceek Women's Health has begun clinical trials for a series of new devices—including a sleeve, a speculum with narrower bills, and a speculum that patients can self-insert. Their goal is to create a variety of specula to serve a variety of patients, rather than recreating another one-size-fits-all tool. "For women who have a lot of tissue, women who have had more than two vaginal births or a high BMI, for women with a history of trauma or rape, for post-menopausal women who have vaginal atrophy—there isn't any product to address their needs," says Fahti Khosrow, Ceek's co-founder and CEO. Give physicians a whole new toolkit, she says, and they can better serve their patients.

Perhaps the most promising new design comes from Duke University, where researchers are testing a device that could circumvent the speculum altogether. Mercy Asiedu, a doctoral candidate in biomedical engineering at Duke, designed a tampon-sized device with a 2 megapixel camera attached to the end. "The speculum was originally designed for a physician to view the cervix from outside the body," Asiedu says, "but with current technology, you can easily view the cervix from inside the body."

Asiedu tested her prototype in a pilot study with 15 volunteers this year, the results of which were published in the journal PLOS One in May. Every single patient said the smaller device provided a better experience than the speculum.

The Duke study looked at patient satisfaction, and Asiedu acknowledges that physicians may offer more criticism of the device. The design emphasized comfort, modesty, and patient empowerment, not necessarily ease of use for physicians. "With a speculum, you just shove it in and expand it as wide as you want to get the visualization you want," Asiedu says. "With this, you have to put it in and gently move it around, kind of like a joystick."

When Stewart and her team set off to redesign the speculum, they knew what they were up against. Plus, Stewart says, "I hadn't even seen a speculum."

So before they started researching or sketching ideas out, Stewart and Kumar listed the things that had bothered them in gynecological exams. There was the noise (like a can opener), the temperature (freezing cold), the feeling inside (as if someone was stretching your insides like a rubber band). When they acquired a set of specula, one plastic and one metal, they realized they needed to change the aesthetics too. These things looked like medieval torture devices.

First, Stewart explored how to silence that ratcheting sound. She and Fran Wang, a mechanical engineer at Frog, investigated new types of opening mechanisms. No concept was too bizarre. What if, like a pufferfish, they used saline to inflate the device from the inside? Or what if they used air, blowing it up like an air mattress? They looked for inspiration in nature (cobra hoods), in machining (milling chucks), and in everyday objects (bicycle pumps); they studied how a tripod clamps open and shut, how ski bindings clip in and out, searching for ideas that might replace the old-fashioned screw mechanism.

Frog

Next, they considered new materials. Instead of constructing the device out of plastic or metal, they decided to cover the whole thing in autoclavable silicone—a material that wouldn't feel cold, could be easily sterilized, and would make insertion more comfortable. "On the metal speculum, there are pokey bits," says Wang. "Those shouldn't go near your delicate body parts! Having all of that covered in silicon, it prevents tissue from getting damaged. And also when you look at it, it's nicer."

They experimented with using three prongs instead of two, opening the device into a triangle shape. They tried shrinking the device to the size of a tampon, or borrowing design language from the vibrator industry. They put the device's handle at different angles, ranging from 90 degrees to 120 degrees, to find most ergonomic position for physicians. And then they 3-D printed a few different prototypes and put them in the hands of OB/GYNs and medical providers.

"The one they were really excited about was the one that opened up using three bills, rather than just two," says Stewart. The triangle-shaped opening gave physicians the same field of view without having to open the bills as wide, making the process less "stretchy" for patients. OB/GYNs also liked the device's handle at 110 degrees, which enough extra space between the physician's hand and the patient's body to eliminate the "last scooch" down the examination table. The silicon covering was a big hit, too. A button unlocks or locks the speculum with one hand, freeing up the other hand; a push handle eliminates the need for screws. Even more comforting, the speculum was totally silent.

Conferring with OB/GYNs made one thing very clear, though: The project wouldn't succeed with redesigned hardware alone. Stewart wondered why she felt more comfortable getting a bikini wax than she did seeing the gynecologist once a year, and the answer boiled down to the environment. One felt cold, clinical, and scary; the other, relaxing and personal, even if it was more physically painful. If they wanted to redesign the speculum, they had to redesign the entire experience.

Half a year later, the project has turned into something of a coup d'état on the modern pelvic exam. There's the speculum itself, still in development with the insight from several OB/GYNs who have signed on to help. There's a list of guidelines for physicians, which include simple but meaningful tips like giving patients somewhere to hang their clothes and explaining the components of the exam. "It's never going to be perfect," says Kumar. "So how do we at least prepare people emotionally for how it's going to be, and make them feel like they got some value out of it at the end?"

There's also a mock-up of an app, which would let patients fill out forms, ask questions, or follow a guided meditation before the exam. Kumar invented a gear kit—a stress ball, socks to cover your feet in the stirrups—to improve patient comfort, alongside the new speculum. The team also added Rachel Hobart, a visual designer at Frog, to help brand the experience. The result is called Yona.

For now, the Yona project is still an early-stage design concept. Stewart and Wang are still hashing out new speculum prototypes, while Kumar and Hobart refine the app and experience. They're working with their board of physicians to fine-tune the idea, to negotiate what's feasible and what isn't. And collectively, they're searching for partners who may have similar goals, like the tech-savvy healthcare service One Medical, who can bring Yona from concept into reality.

The trickiest part, it seems, is developing something that physicians will actually adopt. It's not lost on the Frog designers that other prototypes have failed after physicians bristled at the idea of investing in something new, either financially (the cost of purchasing a new device) or mentally (the time it takes to learn how to use a new device). Gynecologists have been using the speculum for over a century, and so far, it's worked. Why change now? "You could create the most beautiful, most unique, most user-friendly device, but if a doctor doesn't want to learn how to use it, your patient's never going to see it," Stewart says.

But Wang says that's mostly a matter of getting the product out there, showing physicians how great it can be for them and for their patients. She knows the traditional speculum works fine for most gynecologists. "It passes, but it's not great," says Wang. "But we're working on making it better. When you give [physicians] the option to choose a better one or a worse one, then they're going to choose the better one. But they might not know that until they get that option."

Read more: https://www.wired.com/story/the-speculum-finally-gets-a-modern-redesign/

‘Matilda’ star Mara Wilson has a message for the LGBTQ community: Come out.

Before I ever spent hour upon hour with my nose buried in the pages of a “Harry Potter” book, there was “Matilda.”

I’ve always loved to read and have hauled too-big piles of books home from the library (although not in a red wagon, I will admit) more times than I can count. Plus, what 7-year-old budding queer femme doesn’t dream of discovering a secret superpower and running away from her loneliness into a beautiful world of friendship where she can play games and eat cookies all day long?

I mean, it always seemed like a pretty solid life choice to me. Matilda has followed me ever since childhood. And I’m not necessarily talking about the Danny DeVito movie or even the Roald Dahl book. I’m talking about Matilda herself; Matilda the person; Matilda Wormwood, the character made real by a young girl in a 98-minute-long movie I’d wager nearly every millennial (in the U.S., at least) has seen. I’m talking about Mara Wilson.

It felt like fate that Wilson and I would meet.

She went to college with one of my family members and, once I moved back to New York, kept showing up at various comedy events I attended around the city.

Then, in early 2017 —  after coming out publicly the previous summer  —  she became a Lambda Legal donor. These aren’t even all the connections we’ve had over the years. But ultimately, I knew that it was only a matter of time.

So when we sat down to talk last week, to say that I was excited might be an understatement. Little did I know just how much her own experience as a queer woman would mirror mine.

Wilson came out publicly as bi  —  although she now tends to prefer the label queer (“I like queer more than I like bisexual, but I have no problem with people calling me bisexual,” she says)  —  on Twitter in the wake of June 2016’s tragedy at the Pulse Nightclub in Orlando. At the time, she’d recently come out to most of her close friends and family (they took it well — her brother “did not even look up from his enchilada” when she told him, she tells me through laughter), and she felt that it was important as someone in the public eye to show solidarity with her community.

The news quickly went viral, spreading across social media and trending on Facebook. “I think that if you’re in a place of security and privilege  —  which I can admit that I am  —  it’s important for you to [come out],” she says. “I don’t see myself as anybody’s savior, but I’d rather it were me — who can afford therapy and afford this platform — getting harassed for being who I am than a young LGBTQ kid. I think it’s important.”

But the response to her news — while mostly supportive — was not entirely positive.

“I often wish that I hadn’t done it then because I got accused of taking advantage of a tragedy for personal attention,” she says. “Now, clearly I like attention, but I am not so callous as to make a tragedy about myself, my life and my story. That isn’t what I was going for.”

“A lot of people like to tell women — and especially queer women — that they are doing things for attention,” she adds. “And it is strange to me that the worst thing a woman can do is do something for attention.”

Wilson’s words resonated with me more than I can even fully describe. I’ve written about what it’s like to come out and be out as a queer femme woman before but have never really been able to put into words the intense anxiety surrounding the “attention stigma” that comes with having a non-monosexual identity.

See, a few things can happen when you come out as bi (or queer or pan or any of the many varied non-monosexual identities that exist), particularly as a woman.

The first is that folks don’t believe you. Another is that people ignore it. And a third is that a lot of assumptions are made about who you are and what you like.

But the theme underlying all of these reactions is attention. If someone doesn’t believe you, it’s because either they think that bisexuality doesn’t exist or that you’re confused, or they think that you’re saying you’re bi to get attention (frequently all of these thoughts occur synchronously).

If someone ignores it, it’s — again — because they likely believe you’re “doing it for the attention” and don’t want to give you the thing they think you’re seeking. And if someone begins to make assumptions about you, those assumptions are usually — surprise — that you like attention and are innately promiscuous.

“There’s definitely a stigma,” Wilson says. “One of the reasons I didn’t come out for a very long time was because I grew up hearing that bisexual girls were ‘crazy,’ [which is not a term I would use]. I heard that all the time. I heard that bisexual girls were ‘crazy,’ they were greedy, they were selfish and they caused drama. They were the worst. They wanted attention.”

There’s a lot here, but certainly the most interesting (to me, at least) thing about biphobia is the sexism, slut shaming, ableism and mental health stigma that is disguised within it.

“Throughout history, women and women-identified people have had to struggle to get any kind of power or control over their lives,” Wilson says. “And control is seen as a bad thing. It’s seen as being manipulative.”

“When you think of bisexuals, you think of villainy. You think of people using their sexuality to get what they want, using other people and hurting other people,” she adds. “Or just having a lot of sex, and … if you are ‘promiscuous,’ that is seen as being inherently a bad thing.”

Just think of Jenny from “The L Word,” Barbara from “Gotham,” Piper from “Orange Is the New Black,” and Monica from “Shameless.” The list goes on, and this is certainly not a trope limited to only women. But all of these fictional women hold the labels of evil, “crazy,” or promiscuous.

And that’s not even to wade into the deep stigmatized waters of being a person who is bisexual and not a woman. Though we didn’t talk much about it (as it is neither of our experiences) being transgender or gender-nonconforming obviously brings with it its own set of stigma, and similar  —  albeit similarly nuanced  —  stereotypes exist for male-identified people. As Wilson says, “People are punished for femininity or punished for sexuality.”

So how do we go about changing these media tropes? Wilson has some ideas.

“I think that, in the entertainment world, there need to be more bisexual characters for whom bisexuality is just kind of a common thing. It’s ‘so-and-so has red hair and they’re also bisexual,'” Wilson laughs. “That’s definitely something that I’ve tried to write into some of my more recent writing. We’ll see where that goes.”

“The Most Boring Bisexual You’ve Ever Met,” I joke with her. “Exactly!” she exclaims. “It’ll be like, ‘Me the other day, getting up and running on the treadmill, writing a little bit and going to CVS to pick up my prescriptions, and then binge-watching ‘Orphan Black’ because I love Tatiana Maslany so much.'”

“I’d like to see more male-identified people shown as bisexual,” she adds. “Because I think there’s still this belief that men can’t be, which just isn’t true.”

In the end, Wilson believes it’s all about respecting others  —  an issue the LGBTQ community at large has much experience with.

“Is it making somebody happy? Is it improving their life? Is it something that they enjoy? Is it a part of who they are? Yes? Then respect it,” she says. “You don’t need to understand something completely to be OK with it.”

Wilson and I spent about an hour talking, and I could’ve let it go on for so much longer. We joked about our celebrity crushes, chuckled together fake-writing scenes of “The Most Boring Bisexual You’ve Ever Met,” and gave each other advice for meeting other queer women. I’ll never forget that. It felt like I was catching up with an old friend. And in a way, I was.

This story first appeared on Lambda Legal and is reprinted here with permission.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/matilda-star-mara-wilson-has-a-message-for-the-lgbtq-community-come-out

In Honor Of #NationalFastFoodDay, See What Celebs Order At Their Fave Fast Food Restaurants!

Have a love/hate relationship with fast food? You’re not alone!

Many stars can only maintain their clean, healthy diets for so long until they find themselves scarfing down a buffet of Cheesy Gordita Crunches in the Taco Bell parking lot.

Take it from Anna Kendrick, who has gone on the record describing her dirty, secret relationship with the fast food chain.

But save that shame for tomorrow — because today, November 16, is #NationalFastFoodDay, and we are therefore obligated by the Law of Hashtags to eat as much fast food as possible!

Get your appetite going by seeing what these stars order at their fave fast food restaurants…

CLICK HERE to view “What The Stars Order At Fast Food Restaurants!”

CLICK HERE to view “What The Stars Order At Fast Food Restaurants!”

CLICK HERE to view “What The Stars Order At Fast Food Restaurants!”

CLICK HERE to view “What The Stars Order At Fast Food Restaurants!”

CLICK HERE to view “What The Stars Order At Fast Food Restaurants!”

P.S. Dear Taco Bell, please bring back lava sauce!!!

Read more: http://perezhilton.com/2017-11-16-national-fast-food-day-anna-kendrick-celebrities-order-menu-taco-bell

12 Wedding Vows That Are WAY Too Honest for the Altar

It’s been six years since Tiffani and I exchanged vows. Like most soon-to-be-married couples, we had an idea of what marriage would look like. After all, we watched “chick flicks,” read a few marriage books, and spent time with older married couples.

Looking back, however, I realize I didn’t know much at all about marriage. The words I promised Tiffani at our wedding were idealistic and romantic. This isn’t much different from the traditional vows you hear at almost any wedding. “To have and hold, for better or for worse, in sickness and in health, until death do us part.”

There’s nothing wrong with these vows. But, seriously. Who really understands what they mean?

I know what you’re thinking. Why do marriage vows matter?

Here’s why. Vows are promises. But not just any promises. Vows are markers that guide your marriage. So, while I’m not against writing vows Casanova would applaud, I am against vows that are more romantic and emotional than practical and honest.

Let’s be real. In a culture that idolizes romantic love, we don’t need any more Shakespearean vows. We need vows that will shape and impact marriages.

Here are 12 truthful marriage vows you won’t hear at a wedding.

1.) I PROMISE TO NEVER FLIRT, LUST, OR DESIRE THE ATTENTION OF SOMEONE OF THE OPPOSITE SEX. 

When you get married, you vow faithfulness to your spouse. You vow exclusivity to them. You promise to never flirt, lust, or seek attention from the opposite sex. You promise to protect your mind from images that aren’t your spouse.

You don’t listen to music that degrades people. You don’t allow your eyes to view images or watch shows portraying people as objects and relationships as indispensable. These are obvious, right?

But when you vow exclusivity to your spouse, you vow more than physical purity. You vow emotional purity as well. You promise to never confide in a secretary at work or be flattered by someone of the opposite sex.

Emotional purity is much less obvious than physical purity, but it’s just as destructive. You must fight to give all of your emotions, your desire to impress, your attention, struggles, heartaches, and everything in between to your spouse. These don’t belong to other people. Fight for purity, both physically and emotionally.

2.) I PROMISE TO NEVER EXPECT A 50/50 MARRIAGE. 

There’s no such thing as a 50/50 marriage.

You can’t keep score in a marriage. There’s no such thing as a 50/50 relationship. That’s a contract.

Give 100% of yourself every day. Some days, 100% won’t be much. But on those days, trust your spouse will pick you up. Regardless, let go of this give-and-take idea.

Just give. Giving is the essence of love and the heart of the one who created marriage, God.

3.) I PROMISE TO MAKE THE GOSPEL THE MISSION OF OUR MARRIAGE.

Most marriages struggle because the relationship is the end goal. The mission of most marriages is to provide stability to your life, to have a family, to have a companion. Get the idea?

But God created marriage, and because he created it, the goal is larger than selfish desires. The goal is to glorify him. Even in Christian circles, few couples make the gospel the mission of their marriage. And this explains why Paul said it was better NOT to marry (1 Cor. 7). Your interest would be divided between your spouse and God.

Your mission on earth is to serve God. Everyday. This mission doesn’t change when you get married. But if you’re not intentional, pleasing your spouse will take precedent over serving God.

4.) I PROMISE TO LOVE WHO YOU ARE TODAY, NOT WHO I WANT YOU TO BE.

For the sake of your sanity and your marriage, please listen. You can’t change your spouse. You don’t have that power.

If this is your goal, two varmets will infest your relationship: bitterness and resentment.

For years, Tiffani and I tried to change each other. It wasn’t until we stopped trying to change each other and started enjoying one another that we experienced intimacy.

One of the profound mysteries of marriage is two people with different values learning to love, flourish, and celebrate one another. It’s not easy, but that’s why you must rely on God and embrace the unique values He places in every person, including your spouse.

This sounds overly simplistic because it is…just love the person in front of you. Don’t long for a “fixed” version of your spouse. Don’t hope for a day when your spouse changes. Just love the current version of your partner. Doing this will transform your marriage.

5.) I PROMISE YOU WILL NEVER BE RESPONSIBLE FOR MY HAPPINESS.

Marriage isn’t a quest to find happiness or completion. God created you complete. You must learn to love yourself before trying to receive or extend love.

When another person is responsible for your happiness, you idolize that person. You obsess over everything. You check Facebook profiles, text messages, and missed calls. It’s a miserable way to live. It’s a terrible recipe for a quality relationship.

Be confident in the man or woman God created you to be. Then you will be free to love your spouse the way God intended.

6.) I PROMISE TO MAKE MY EXPECTATIONS CLEAR.

This was probably the greatest barrier in my marriage the first few years. Tiffani and I had expectations that influenced our decisions and shaped our understanding of marriage.

Tiffani’s expectations for me were influenced by her dad. Tiffani has an amazing dad. I respect him. I’ve learned a lot from him. But I’m not Tiffani’s dad. Likewise, my expectations for Tiffani were shaped by my mom. I have an amazing mom. But it’s unfair to expect Tiffani to respond the way my mom responded. And these unrealistic expectations created a lot of disappointments.

Your spouse should never endure disappointments as a result of ignorance. State your expectations clearly. All of them. Be thorough. What do you expect from a wife? A husband? What does marriage look like to you? What does sex look like?

If you can’t state your expectations, either because you don’t know them or you’re too shy to say them, it’s a red flag that you aren’t ready for marriage.

7.) I PROMISE TO NEVER SAY “I FORGIVE YOU” UNLESS I TRULY MEAN IT. 

Your spouse will hurt you and vice-versa. When this happens, search your heart, seek God, and forgive your spouse the same way God forgives you.

Don’t forgive with conditions. Don’t say, “I forgive you” when you’re really storing your spouse’s mistake to use as ammo in a future argument.

Unless you forgive the way God forgives you, completely and unconditionally, a wall will grow taller and taller in your relationship. Eventually, bitterness and resentment will make intimacy impossible, and your marriage will be nothing more than two roommates living under the same roof.

8.) I PROMISE TO BE FOR YOU, TO ENCOURAGE YOUR DREAMS, TO HELP YOU BECOME THE MAN OR WOMAN GOD CREATED YOU TO BE.

Many days you won’t feel like being for your spouse. But you must be for your partner if you want your marriage to grow. What does this look like? Here are a few examples.

  1. You pray for your spouse.
  2. You affirm your spouse’s strengths and gifts.
  3. You focus more on the positive aspects of your spouse’s personality and actions than the negative ones.
  4. You help your spouse pursue his or her dreams and talents.
  5. You make your relationship a safe place for hard questions and deep conversations.

When you are for your spouse they open up like a flower, stepping into their relationships, workplace, etc. with boldness and courage. Is your spouse living with boldness and courage?

9.) I PROMISE TO NEVER COMPLAIN ABOUT OUR MARRIAGE, IN GENERAL, OR YOU, IN PARTICULAR, TO OTHERS.

God created marriage to be a private relationship between two people.

God created marriage to be a private relationship between two people. In the social media era, virtually everything is available to the public. Privacy is viewed as stinginess, almost as though six billion people are entitled to full access of your life.

Don’t buy the lie.

Your marriage is private. When you fight, your girlfriends don’t need to hear your husband is a jerk. Your homeboys don’t need to hear that your wife is irrational and ridiculous. No one, other than your spouse, should know intimate details about your sex life.

Don’t publicize a relationship God designed to be private.

10.) I PROMISE TO BELIEVE THE BEST IS YET TO COME, REGARDLESS OF HOW GOOD OR BAD THINGS ARE TODAY.

Regardless of the circumstances in your marriage, never spend more time looking in the rear-view mirror than the windshield. You must always believe the best is yet to come.

Why? God is a futurist.

He always leads people towards the future, towards the unknown. This forward movement is rooted in hope. Hope that the unknown is better than the known because God forges the path.

But here’s the lie our world says: future circumstances are tied to current actions. So, if your marriage is miserable right now, it won’t get better in the future. But the future isn’t dependent on external actions. It’s dependent on internal perspective.

In other words, you must choose to believe tomorrow will be better than today. If you choose this, it will be true, regardless of the actions of your spouse.

11.) I PROMISE TO PROTECT OUR MARRIAGE FROM OUTSIDE INFLUENCES, INCLUDING KIDS, WORK, AND IN-LAWS.

Marriage is about intimacy, and intimacy requires time and exclusivity. Here’s what this means practically. You must learn to say no. Go ahead and practice now.

Dr. Henry Cloud, in his book Boundaries In Marriage, says, “A marriage is only as strong as what it costs to protect it.”

Saying yes to outside influences means saying no to your marriage. You will hurt people’s feelings. Your parents won’t understand. They might even call you selfish. Your golf game might take a hit. Your friends will send you passive-aggressive text messages because you aren’t spending time with them. Your co-workers might think you’re uncommitted because you choose to spend a night with your spouse instead of working late on a project. Unfortunately, even your church might make off-hand comments.

I’m giving you a heads up because these are the costs you must take to protect your marriage. If you don’t do this, your marriage will fail. And, trust me, it’s must easier to implement this vow on day 1 of your marriage than several years in.

12.) I PROMISE TO SURROUND OUR MARRIAGE WITH A COMMUNITY OF CHRISTIANS WHO WILL ENCOURAGE AND SUPPORT US.

I’m going to be real here. At some point, you will want to give up. I know what you’re thinking. “Not me. I would never leave my spouse.”

That’s real sweet and all, but you’re naive.

Marriage is crazy hard. Eventually, your spouse will wound you deeply, you will lose the will to invest in your relationship, or you will come to the realization that marriage is more work than you signed up for.

When this season comes, the line between giving up and pressing forward will be drawn by your community. If your community caters to your ego and feeds your “woe is me” attitude, the line will be easy to cross. If you aren’t plugged into a local church, doing life with a group of Christians, the line will be easier to cross. If, however, you surround your marriage with a community of Christians who are for you, the line will be much harder to cross.

The presence of Christian community is so important that I ask those attending weddings I perform to make vows to the couple being married. After the couple’s vows, the audience stands. Then I ask them two questions.

  1. ________ (couple being married) have asked for your prayers and support as they begin marriage together. Do you pledge to pray for them as they work on building a deep and abiding love? 
  2.  ________ (couple being married) will need determination and patience to cultivate their love for one another. Do you pledge to support them in every way as they build a Christ-centered marriage?

After each question, the audience responds with “We will.” It’s powerful to see the crowd looking at the couple, vowing to pray for and support them.

For too long, wedding vows have focused on emotional, romantic love and not practical, solid pillars. You probably won’t hear these vows at any wedding you attend. But they’re essential for building a marriage that lasts.

Six years of marriage taught me one thing. Marriage is the most difficult, rewarding, painful, joyous journey you will embark on. And when the storms of life come, a few well-structured, emotional sentences won’t do you any good. You need something more practical. More realistic. You need guardrails to keep you from running off the road.

To my wife: I love you so much. Thank you for challenging me to become a better man, husband, father, and follower of Jesus. I love every day with you. I love every moment with you.

IT’S YOUR TURN. WHAT ARE SOME PRACTICAL MARRIAGE VOWS YOU WISH YOU WOULD HAVE SAID ON YOUR WEDDING DAY? LEAVE A COMMENT BELOW. 

I love you all. To God be the glory forever. Amen!

 

Read more: https://faithit.com/12-wedding-vows-way-honest-altar-frank-powell/

Sephora Hit With Lawsuit After Woman Claims She Got Herpes From One Of Their Testers!

Let this be a warning to shoppers!

A California woman is suing Sephora after she says she contracted herpes from using one of their lipstick tester samples in 2015, this according to

The unnamed woman is suing for emotional distress from her “incurable lifelong affliction.”

Sephora hasn’t commented on the lawsuit, although a spokesperson did share a statement with Fashionista:

“While it is our policy not to comment on litigation, the health and safety of our clients is our foremost priority. We take product hygiene very seriously and we are dedicated to following best practices in our stores.”

Yikes!

May this be a reminder to stay away from the communal testers…

Read more: http://perezhilton.com/cocoperez/2017-10-31-sephora-herpes-scandal-tester-lawsuit-california

How Many Calories You Really Burn At SoulCycle, Barre & Other Workout Classes

Ever since Lady Gaga replaced her personal trainer for her own SoulCycle bike and we started shopping at Bandier instead of Lululemon, there’s been a shift in the world of working out. Boutique fitness is trendier than ever, and betches across the world are drinking the organic sugar-free Kool-Aid. I mean, there’s a Barry’s Bootcamp open in Milan, so you know this shit has gone global. Workout classes are the new jog in the park, but are they really worth the price tag? We’ve been dying to know how many calories we actually burn in these classes, so we did some digging and the results are in. Keep in mind that everyone’s bodies are different so it’s hard to give you a straightforward number, here’s how many calories you (approximately) burn in your go-to classes:

1. Spin

Spin classes have surprisingly been around for decades, but they didn’t really get big until SoulCycle developed a cult following the size of China’s population and was then followed by Flywheel, Peloton, Swerve, and a few other wannabes. A lot of these studios tell people they can burn up to 1,000 calories in a class, but that’s ambitious, even if you’re like, really pretty athletic. If you’re working as hard as the teacher is telling you to work, you’re probably burning around 500 calories in a 45-minute class. This obviously varies depending on the person, the class, and how much effort you’re putting in, but just think logically. Like, if I’m drenched and crippled by the end of a spin class, I know I burned a shit ton of calories. I mean, It’s like I have ESPN or something. Can I take all these free bananas now?

2. Circuit Training & HIIT

Circuit-style classes are becoming more and more popular recently, and it’s not just because girls have realized they’ll look good if they step off the treadmill and start lifting some weights. HIIT classes are short and effective, because the class is scientifically built to make you work in short, intense intervals that are meant to spike your heart rate and keep your body burning calories for a day after the workout. The scientific term for it is called EPOC, and the results are dope. So, even if you’re only burning like, 300-400 calories in a 40-minute HIIT class, your body is put in a calorie-burning mode, which can last up to 36 hours, depending on how hard you worked. Thank you, science.

3. Barre & Pilates

Barre and pilates classes are obv different in many ways, but they’re both focused on muscle toning and pulsing movements, so we’re grouping them together for convenience reasons. Basically, whether you’re on a pilates reformer or doing pulsing squats with a bouncy ball in between your legs, you’re doing resistance training, which means you’re damaging your muscles in class. Afterwards, the muscle fibers repair themselves, which makes your muscles grow and your body get toned AF. So, these classes usually burn only 200-300 calories, but the point of them is to spike your metabolic rate and strengthen your muscles, so don’t freak out if you’re not soaked and exhausted by the end of class—you’re getting more long-term results that are not just about the amount of calories you burn in class.

4. Boxing

Boxing has had a trendy revival lately, so we’ve been dying to know what’s so damn life-changing about these classes. Gotham Gym and The Dogpound have always been packed with celebs like Gigi Hadid, Shay Mitchell, and Karlie Kloss, but now new studios like Rumble and Shadowbox are taking over the NYC fitness scene, and it’s not just because the trainers literally look like the strong versions of Victoria’s Secret models. Boutique boxing studios incorporate traditional boxing drills in their classes, but they also usually have HIIT and strength training segments built into the class. With the cardio of boxing and the effects of weightlifting combined, these classes can burn anywhere from 500-800 calories. It’s also a cheaper form of therapy if you’re particularly angry at the moment. Just saying.

5. Hot Yoga

We know there are a lot of different types of yoga classes out there, but we can’t sit here and dissect the caloric differences between Vinyasa, Bikram, and Ashtanga (pretty sure that’s the name of a bomb sushi restaurant, though). We’re talking about hot yoga because people tend to think they’re burning a million calories due to the yoga poses being done at such a high temperature. While it’s true that hot yoga classes take place in rooms set at over 100 degrees, the extra heat just makes your body lose extra water, not fat. If you’re taking a rigorous yoga class, you could technically burn up to 400 calories, but most probably clock in at around 200. Basically, the “hot” part doesn’t mean more calories burned, it just means one more day that you can’t rely on dry shampoo again. Kind of a bummer.

6. Dance Cardio

Although Zumba hit its peak in 2009 and pretty much died since then, there are a lot of types of dance-based workouts that burn a ton of calories. Again, everyone’s bodies are so different, but if you’re really jumping around and kicking your legs in the air for an hour straight, you can probably burn up to 500-600 calories. 305Fitness in NYC claims you’ll burn 800 in a class, but that’s probably a stretch, unless you’re that annoying person in the front row who does the absolute most the entire time (you know the one). Most dance cardio classes take breaks and have active rest periods, so it’s obviously not as intense as spin or boxing. But then again, a workout is a workout, so if you’d rather dance than peddle on a bike until your quads feel like they’re literally on fire, we totally get it. Do the dance class. 

Read more: http://www.betches.com/how-many-calories-you-burn-in-workout-classes

uBiome launches an at-home womens health test for HPV, STIs and bacterial vaginosis

SmartJane is a new women’s health test out from uBiome today that promises to check for 23 vaginal flora as well as 19 strains of the human papilloma virus and a string of sexually transmitted diseases like Chlamydia and gonorrhea from the comfort of your own home.

uBiome, which launched in 2012 to sequence and study the human microbiome, is best known for its at-home gut health test, SmartGut. This test sequences the DNA of your, well, poop to determine what’s going on in your digestive tract.

The SmartJane test, which can be ordered from your doctor or online through uBiomes network of physicians, is along the same vein in that it can detect and then genotype any trace of HPV to determine the strain as well as tell you what kind of healthy or unhealthy bacteria you’re working with…down there.

The genetic component is what sets this test apart from other at-home STD tests available from startups like MyLabBox or Everlywell. While these tests work in much the same way — you order online and then send it out to a certified lab for results — genotyping the organisms that might live among your lady parts can help determine the seriousness of the strain.

You can also go into a clinic or your doctor’s office to get tested for STI’s such as HPV. However, uBiome’s kit includes certain tests not readily available in other at-home tests or common to doctor’s offices such as Mycoplasma genitalium, which is an asymptomatic STI that can cause unexplained infertility.

“Often people are tested for it when there’s evidence of infertility but then it’s too late,” Dr. Jessica Richman, founder of uBiome told TechCrunch.

uBiome has collected thousands of samples over five years in a peer-reviewed study and claims a near 100 percent accuracy in detection of these diseases. The startup is now publishing a scientific paper on its findings

As with its original gut health test, uBiome processes the SmartJane tests in a CLIA-certified and CAP-accredited lab and then sends results to its HIIPA-compliant website. Those receiving results indicating an infection are then directed to speak with their doctor or to uBiome’s external clinical care network for further instructions.

Dr. Richman emphasized the SmartJane test was not meant to replace the testing you might get from a doctor’s office, but was rather something to help you further test in between well woman visits.

It may also encourage women to get testing for certain possibly life-threatening STI’s such as HPV. There are over 170 strains of the virus but only a few cause deadly cancer if left untreated. However, less than 80 percent of women in the U.S. go to their OBGYN for regular Pap screenings. An at-home test may take away some of the worry and stress of going in for a Pap Smear (the commonly used method of gathering cells to test for HPV).

In fact, women are more than twice as likely to self-test than go to their doctor first, according to a meta-analysis of 10 studies.

“What we are doing is making novel tests that are, in addition to what’s on the market, easier to get,” Dr. Richman said.

Those interested can either request the test through their doctor or go online and order the test through uBiome where (as stated above) a licensed physician will be assigned to review your test first.

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2017/11/14/ubiome-launches-an-at-home-womens-health-test-for-hpv-stis-and-bacterial-vaginosis/

5 Ways Dry Shampoo Is Sabotaging Your Hair

I would try to beat around the bush with this one, but given what the headline is, there’s really no dodging it. I’m about to ruin your day, your week, your month, and even your year. On the bright side, this isn’t another article about Trump’s latest fuckups controversial tweet. Instead, it’s about the godawful ways dry shampoo is a scum-sucking road whore. It basically ruins your hair’s life, aka your life as well, each time you use it. I love dry shampoo as much as you, and in fact, I love my dry shampoo’d hair more than what my hair looks like out of the shower. I think we can agree that the volume, bounce, and texture dry shampoo provides is incomparable, not to mention the fact that it allows our lazy asses to skip a long and tedious hair wash routine. However, since nothing ever, ever, *ever* works in our favor, it turns out this shit is bad for you. I know, like, wtf did we do to deserve this? You don’t have to toss out your Batiste or Not Your Mother’s just yet, but I would think twice before using three days in a row.

1. It Could Cause Hair Loss

I don’t think any of us ever questioned just exactly what causes our hair to look so fab after using dry shampoo. As long as we woke up breathing with hair on our heads, it’s fine. But, dry shampoo is actually made of chemicals that aren’t really all that great for our hair. Whether you use it excessively or encounter it for the first time, you could basically develop dermatitis after use. You fucking guessed it—anything that ends with “itis” is a bigger red flag than a “U up?” text. This is a severe allergic reaction that causes intense irritation, which may result in drastic hair loss in the long-term. You’re not, like, guaranteed to lose all your hair if you abuse dry shampoo, but if your hair is already on the thinner side, be wary.

2. It Can Contribute To Breakouts

If you really think about it, dry shampoo is just a spray we leave on all day and don’t think about. Naturally. Since it’s just a product sitting on our scalp for hours on end, it’s seriously clogging up our pores. Just fuck me up, honestly. It continues to build up oils, dirt, and bacteria, which then = scalpne (scalp + acne), and since this is your head we’re talking about, the build-up can trail down to your upper forehead where it may wreak havoc as well. *Screams internally*

3. It Might Irritate Your Scalp

Before the damage gets to your hair, it starts with your scalp. Since dry shampoo comes into contact with the scalp first, it can cause a v uncomfortable irritation. Overusing dry shampoo by leaving it on for more than a day or using multiple times in a row causes a buildup of grime—even after washing! This leads to a super inflamed, itchy, and flaky scalp. Talk about gross, and talk about hella dandruff. Pass.

4. It May Stunt Your Hair Growth Fo’ Life

As we’ve already covered, dry shampoo is essentially a temporary plug for oiliness. As a result, I’ve already told you like, a million times, that the constant use and buildup of oil and grime leads to clogged up pores. When this happens too often, your hair follicles are basically suffocating and blocked from growing any further. If it gets too severe, your hair will not only begin to thin or fall out, but it will eventually stunt your hair’s growth, and you’ll probs look like a British man. IDK maybe that’s just a theory, but either way, that’s the shit we don’t like.

5. It Actually Makes Your Hair Greasier

Contrary to popular belief, if used too often, dry shampoo can actually make your hair way more greasy than it was to begin with. Although it’s supposed to absorb the oil, it continues to absorb the natural kind that our hair actually *needs* and does so while sitting on top of existing grease. After some time, your hair ends up producing more oil than it naturally does to make up for the lack of moisture. End result? Looking like a greaseball more often than not.

 

Read more: http://www.betches.com/5-ways-dry-shampoo-is-sabotaging-your-hair