Chelsea Clinton comes to Barron Trump’s defense after conservative criticism.

It’s not often that the Tucker Carlson-founded Daily Caller criticizes President Trump, but that changed on Monday when the site went after his son.

No, not Eric. Not Don Jr., either. The Daily Caller had a bone to pick with Trump’s youngest son, Barron.

Of all the things to raise the conservative outlet’s hackles, it wasn’t the president’s coddling of white supremacists, his failure to enact any major pillars of policy, or his snap decision to ban an entire population group from the military — but rather the fact that his 11-year-old son wears T-shirts and shorts on summer vacation.

To that, I have to ask: Are we still f-ing doing this?

In this photo from June, Barron wears jeans and a T-shirt. You know, like regular kids wear. Photo by Chris Kleponis-Pool/Getty Images.

The article, “It’s High Time Barron Trump Starts Dressing Like He’s In the White House” by Ford Springer, lambasted the youngest Trump for looking “like he was hopping on Air Force One for a trip to the movie theater” in a photo of the family returning from a recent trip. (The article also refers to President Trump, he of the ill-fitting suits and cartoonishly long ties, as “dapper” — so maybe Springer isn’t the best qualified person to write about fashion? Sigh.)

It was just a few months ago that we were all reminded that presidential children are off-limits.

When a “Saturday Night Live” writer made an insensitive joke about Barron Trump, the White House responded, news outlets (including the Daily Caller) covered it, and the writer was eventually suspended (again, covered in detail by the Daily Caller, so they definitely know that the whole “criticizing presidents’ kids” is a big no-no, right?). So why would the Daily Caller criticize Barron, and why would they do it now? Maybe it’s for the sake of consistency since they regularly targeted Sasha and Malia Obama?

Respecting the privacy of the president’s children — especially those who are underage — isn’t a new concept. Back in January, Chelsea Clinton stood up for Barron after he received a barrage of hate and criticism around the time of the inauguration, writing, “Barron Trump deserves the chance every child does — to be a kid.”

In response to the Daily Caller article, the former first daughter again came to Barron’s defense.

In conclusion, leave Barron alone. Seriously.

There’s a lot to criticize about Donald Trump, but no matter how you feel about him, leave his 11-year-old kid out of it. Barron didn’t choose what family to be born into, and he shouldn’t have to meet some arbitrary standards set by a complete stranger in the media. Growing up is tough enough as it is without having the world watching your every move, so let’s all agree to cut Barron some slack.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/chelsea-clinton-comes-to-barron-trumps-defense-after-conservative-criticism

Plastic fibres found in tap water around the world, study reveals

Exclusive: Tests show billions of people globally are drinking water contaminated by plastic particles, with 83% of samples found to be polluted

Microplastic contamination has been found in tap water in countries around the world, leading to calls from scientists for urgent research on the implications for health.

Scores of tap water samples from more than a dozen nations were analysed by scientists for an investigation by Orb Media, who shared the findings with the Guardian. Overall, 83% of the samples were contaminated with plastic fibres.

The US had the highest contamination rate, at 94%, with plastic fibres found in tap water sampled at sites including Congress buildings, the US Environmental Protection Agencys headquarters, and Trump Tower in New York. Lebanon and India had the next highest rates.

European nations including the UK, Germany and France had the lowest contamination rate, but this was still 72%. The average number of fibres found in each 500ml sample ranged from 4.8 in the US to 1.9 in Europe.

The new analyses indicate the ubiquitous extent of microplastic contamination in the global environment. Previous work has been largely focused on plastic pollution in the oceans, which suggests people are eating microplastics via contaminated seafood.

We have enough data from looking at wildlife, and the impacts that its having on wildlife, to be concerned, said Dr Sherri Mason, a microplastic expert at the State University of New York in Fredonia, who supervised the analyses for Orb. If its impacting [wildlife], then how do we think that its not going to somehow impact us?

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A magnified image of clothing microfibres from washing machine effluent. One study found that a fleece jacket can shed as many as 250,000 fibres per wash. Photograph: Courtesy of Rozalia Project

A separate small study in the Republic of Ireland released in June also found microplastic contamination in a handful of tap water and well samples. We dont know what the [health] impact is and for that reason we should follow the precautionary principle and put enough effort into it now, immediately, so we can find out what the real risks are, said Dr Anne Marie Mahon at the Galway-Mayo Institute of Technology, who conducted the research.

Mahon said there were two principal concerns: very small plastic particles and the chemicals or pathogens that microplastics can harbour. If the fibres are there, it is possible that the nanoparticles are there too that we cant measure, she said. Once they are in the nanometre range they can really penetrate a cell and that means they can penetrate organs, and that would be worrying. The Orb analyses caught particles of more than 2.5 microns in size, 2,500 times bigger than a nanometre.

Microplastics can attract bacteria found in sewage, Mahon said: Some studies have shown there are more harmful pathogens on microplastics downstream of wastewater treatment plants.

Plastic fibres found in tap water across the world

Microplastics are also known to contain and absorb toxic chemicals and research on wild animals shows they are released in the body. Prof Richard Thompson, at Plymouth University, UK, told Orb: It became clear very early on that the plastic would release those chemicals and that actually, the conditions in the gut would facilitate really quite rapid release. His research has shown microplastics are found in a third of fish caught in the UK.

The scale of global microplastic contamination is only starting to become clear, with studies in Germany finding fibres and fragments in all of the 24 beer brands they tested, as well as in honey and sugar. In Paris in 2015, researchers discovered microplastic falling from the air, which they estimated deposits three to 10 tonnes of fibres on the city each year, and that it was also present in the air in peoples homes.

This research led Frank Kelly, professor of environmental health at Kings College London, to tell a UK parliamentary inquiry in 2016: If we breathe them in they could potentially deliver chemicals to the lower parts of our lungs and maybe even across into our circulation. Having seen the Orb data, Kelly told the Guardian that research is urgently needed to determine whether ingesting plastic particles is a health risk.

The new research tested 159 samples using a standard technique to eliminate contamination from other sources and was performed at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. The samples came from across the world, including from Uganda, Ecuador and Indonesia.

How microplastics end up in drinking water is for now a mystery, but the atmosphere is one obvious source, with fibres shed by the everyday wear and tear of clothes and carpets. Tumble dryers are another potential source, with almost 80% of US households having dryers that usually vent to the open air.

We really think that the lakes [and other water bodies] can be contaminated by cumulative atmospheric inputs, said Johnny Gasperi, at the University Paris-Est Creteil, who did the Paris studies. What we observed in Paris tends to demonstrate that a huge amount of fibres are present in atmospheric fallout.

Plastic fibres may also be flushed into water systems, with a recent study finding that each cycle of a washing machine could release 700,000 fibres into the environment. Rains could also sweep up microplastic pollution, which could explain why the household wells used in Indonesia were found to be contaminated.

In Beirut, Lebanon, the water supply comes from natural springs but 94% of the samples were contaminated. This research only scratches the surface, but it seems to be a very itchy one, said Hussam Hawwa, at the environmental consultancy Difaf, which collected samples for Orb.

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This planktonic arrow worm, Sagitta setosa, has eaten a blue plastic fibre about 3mm long. Plankton support the entire marine food chain. Photograph: Richard Kirby/Courtesy of Orb Media

Current standard water treatment systems do not filter out all of the microplastics, Mahon said: There is nowhere really where you can say these are being trapped 100%. In terms of fibres, the diameter is 10 microns across and it would be very unusual to find that level of filtration in our drinking water systems.

Bottled water may not provide a microplastic-free alternative to tapwater, as the they were also found in a few samples of commercial bottled water tested in the US for Orb.

Almost 300m tonnes of plastic is produced each year and, with just 20% recycled or incinerated, much of it ends up littering the air, land and sea. A report in July found 8.3bn tonnes of plastic has been produced since the 1950s, with the researchers warning that plastic waste has become ubiquitous in the environment.

We are increasingly smothering ecosystems in plastic and I am very worried that there may be all kinds of unintended, adverse consequences that we will only find out about once it is too late, said Prof Roland Geyer, from the University of California and Santa Barbara, who led the study.

Mahon said the new tap water analyses raise a red flag, but that more work is needed to replicate the results, find the sources of contamination and evaluate the possible health impacts.

She said plastics are very useful, but that management of the waste must be drastically improved: We need plastics in our lives, but it is us that is doing the damage by discarding them in very careless ways.

Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2017/sep/06/plastic-fibres-found-tap-water-around-world-study-reveals

10-Yr-Old is Sold to Pimps by Her Own Family11 Years Later, a Stranger Slips Her a Note

From the time she was little, Jessa has always been used and abused. Her family was part of a group of people who sexually abused her on a regular basis, and as a child, she was forced to pose for pornography. As she grew up, posing turned into performing, and Jessa was no longer appearing to do sexual acts in front of a camera, she was being raped on camera.

The spiral continued, and the pornography turned into profitable exploitation. By the age of 10, this beautiful young woman was being sold to pimps.

Jessa grew up in Canada, and lived in a suburban neighborhood where she was sexually exploited on a daily basis. Her neighborhood was “normal” and probably looked similar to where you and I live, but Jessa had no idea. She wasn’t ever sent to school, and never had the opportunity to even see her hometown. The closest thing she had to an education was a sixth-grade mathematics textbook that was thrown at her.

“I was trafficked domestically in Canada, just as I was often taken to the USA and other international countries for the sole purpose of being trafficked.”

When Jessa was 21, a woman approached her after recognizing that she displayed signs of an abused or trafficked person. She gave Jessa a slip of paper with her name and contact information before telling her to call for help anytime. That woman owned a safe house in Colorado where she helped to protect and rehabilitate survivors of human trafficking.

Escaping wasn’t something the 21-year-old had ever considered at the time—she simply never realized she had a choice.

“I didn’t know that there was an opportunity to get away,” Crisp said. “Growing up I thought it was a normal existence because it was normal for me.”

After months of building courage and communicating back and forth with the gal in Colorado, Jessa finally left. The woman helped her get to the airport and got her a plane ticket.

“My escape wasn’t a fairytale like a Disney movie; instead it was encapsulated by fear and months of preparing. I was terrified of the unknown, frightened that I would be hunted down by my pimps and abusers, and scared of what the future would hold. But in addition to being afraid, I also felt freedom for the first time. Freedom was being able to see the big blue sky and seeing the tumbleweed float around on the road as I was driven to a safe house and it felt like sunshine that kissed my face.”

Jessa was free, but her visa posed a threat for the future. Being that she was a Canadian citizen, her tourist visa was only valid for six months, forcing her to return to Canada. She re-located to Vancouver, and got plugged into a safe house there, but only for three weeks.

It was 2010, and the Winter Olympics were about to get underway in Vancouver at the exact same time that the safe house she’d entered was being forced to shut down for lack of financial funding.

Jessa had nowhere to turn, but she knew that the Olympics posed a major threat to her safety. Research shows a spike in human trafficking surrounding major sporting events.

For the second time in her life, Jessa was approached by a woman who suspected she’d been abused.

She explained to Jessa that she houses a number of girls who are in the same situation as her.

“She told me that she wanted to be my mom and that she has a lot of houses of girls like me and that she wanted to take care of me,” said Jessa.

The 21-year-old was beyond grateful to have someone in her new city who was offering to care for her the way she’d been cared for in Colorado. But her vulnerability had failed her. The woman told Jessa that she now had to work for her, and so began the all-too-familiar cycle of being sexually exploited for money.  Once again, Jessa found herself trapped in slavery.

“Men raped me as my body tried to disappear from the deep burning pain, but there was nowhere to go. I wished desperately that this were a nightmare, but without knowing the real names of my pimps, I understood the gravity of my situation. I was a slave once again.”

Jessa says that she felt “numb,” and full of nothing but “shameful pain.” She says she turned the anger she felt toward these men into hatred toward herself.

“I hated the fact that the abuse and trafficking I suffered growing up made me so vulnerable to more abuse and pain. I hated the fact that I trusted someone to help me when I was all alone in a new city. I hated the ways that I longed for safety and for someone to care. And most of all, at that moment, I hated the fact that I was still alive and that I had survived my childhood.”

Unbelievably, Jessa escaped slavery a second time.

She was able to return to the same safe house in Colorado, and with the help of a select few people who had earned her trust, and genuinely cared about her future, Jessa is a completely new person today.

The director of the safe house (and the same woman who originally approached Jessa in 2009) knew that they had to do something to keep her from having to go back to Canada.

She told Jessa that if she enrolled in college, she’d be allowed to stay in the states.

“When the director at the safe house suggested that I enroll in college, I laughed in her face. I thought she was crazy. How could I go to college if I have never had an education growing up? How could I succeed if I had never written a paper in my life and didn’t know how to do simple math problems? In response I was simply told, ‘If you can read, you can learn anything.’ I wrote that phrase on my arm with a black Sharpie every day for over a year.”

After getting her GED, Jessa was accepted into college—something she never dreamed could be possible for someone like her. In 2013, she received the Colorado Authors’ League Scholarship, and she managed to finish college with a 4.0 GPA.

“Last May, when I stood in front of my graduating class to deliver the valedictorian speech, the Sharpie story and many other stories flashed through my mind, including my first day of school when I sat on the parking lot and cried because I was convinced people would shun me if they knew about my past and the things I had been forced to do. Miracles not only happen, but after trauma it is possible to dream again and live life fully.”

Jessa graduated with a BA in Christian counseling and is currently working to get her Master’s Degree in Clinical Mental Health Counseling. She hopes to get a  Psy.D. in Clinical Psychology where she’d like to specialize in trauma recovery.

In addition to the academic achievements and incredible strides she’s made in finding freedom, Jessa met the man of her dreams, and the two got married in Colorado last year.

Jessa Crisp

“It’s been a long journey, but through God’s redeeming love, safe people believing in me when I couldn’t believe in myself, and through people choosing to be in my life for the long haul and walking the messy road of healing by my side—I have changed. My past no longer has the power to hold me captive. I am an overcomer, I am a wife, I am a student, I am a professional, I am a speaker, I am an author, I am leader, I am an agent of change, and I am a confident woman who longs to make a difference in society.”

Jessa is currently raising money for her furthered education. Visit her Go Fund Me Page for more information.

Read more: http://faithit.com/overcomer-survivor-escapes-sex-trafficking-twice-goes-valedictorian/

A terrible tweet about depression has the internet in an uproar.

On Sept. 7, 2017, kickboxer Andrew Tate tweeted that “depression isn’t real.”

“You feel sad, you move on,” he wrote to his 26,000 fans and followers. “You will always be depressed if your life is depressing.”

Andrew Tate is not a medical doctor, mental health professional, nor expert in any related field that would add weight to his (seemingly unsolicited) opinion on the subject. Yet, in a combative 13-part Twitter thread, the athlete argued his assertion is correct because he believes that people living with depression are simply “lazy” and will find any excuse to “absolve responsibilities” to feel better.

As is typically the case when you’re a well-known person spouting falsehoods on an important subject online, people reacted — and fast.

Musician Alex Gaskarth noted making such ill-informed declarations without understanding the issue does harm to real people.

Entrepreneur Vikas Shah pointed out Tate’s tweets reflect how stigma surrounding mental illness keeps people who are struggling from accessing care.

J.K. Rowling — who has butted heads with Tate on Twitter before — suggested the boxer’s tweets say more about his own mental well-being than about the science behind depression.

Comedian Patton Oswalt, who lives with depression, blasted Tate’s initial tweet as “false,” claiming it reads more like an “energy drink tagline” than anything else.

Other users, like Josh Peterson, used the opportunity to spread awareness on the issue and share resources to access help, should anyone reading need them.

(You can check out the full list of Peterson’s helpful links here.)

Tate shared his unfortunate tweet thread just a couple days before World Suicide Prevention Day, so what better time to follow Peterson’s lead here and revisit the facts on what depression is and isn’t?

Depression is unequivocally real.

Or, as the Cleveland Clinic puts it: “[Depression] is a medical problem, not a personal weakness.” We’d never tell someone with cancer to simply think themselves into healing — why would we do so when it comes to depression?

Research shows a combination of faulty mood regulation by the brain, stressful life events, and genetics (among other factors) can all play a role in causing depression, Harvard Medical School emphasized. Contrary to Tate’s assumptions, science has shown us that it’s not a fleeting emotion; it’s a real medical condition, and there’s no real “cure” for it.

The good news is, seeking treatment does help millions of people manage and live happy lives, even with depression.

Many people routinely see therapists, use medications, and prioritize stress-relieving habits (like exercising or getting adequate sleep) that help them stay on top of their mental health.

If you’re struggling, know that you’re not alone. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, depression is a relatively common disorder: about 1 in every 6 American adults will experience depression at some point in their lives. Millions of people can relate to what you’re going through, and many of them are ready to step in and help.

Treatments for mental illness like therapies or medicines (or a combination both) are lifesavers. If you want help, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-8255 or visit the American Psychological Association to learn more.

Read more: http://www.upworthy.com/a-terrible-tweet-about-depression-has-the-internet-in-an-uproar

The Idea Behind These Images Is Nothing New, But They Make You See Food Differently

When it comes to losing weight, we automatically think we have to try and eat the healthiest foods we can to be successful.

British fitness blogger Lucy Mountain knows all too well what a struggle it can be to eat healthy and still feel satisfied. She wants to send the message that we can enjoy the food we eat and reach our goals as long as we stay mindful about what we put in our bodies and our portion sizes.

That’s why Mountain is trying to change the way we look at our meals by creating visual comparisons between what is considered junk food and health food, and she makes good points.

“Same amount of food, different calories.”

Mountain points out that the only differences between these two meals are the meat and oil used to cook it.

The meat on the left is five percent fat beef, while the beef on the right contains 12 percent fat. The left meal was cooked with Fry Light olive oil spray and the right was cooked with a tablespoon of olive oil. While Mountain stresses that nothing is wrong with using either, keeping these differences in mind and swapping them can help with weight management.

Read more: http://www.viralnova.com/food-comparisons/

Seriously? An Obamacare architect is worried that Trump will trigger a healthcare ‘crisis’

Former Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius joined other former HHS heads in warning President Trump to be careful and not trigger a healthcare “new crisis.”

Read more: http://twitchy.com/jacobb-38/2017/08/20/seriously-an-obamacare-architect-is-worried-that-trump-will-trigger-a-healthcare-crisis/

The dark side of optimism: How the trait you value most could be ruining you

Mark Cuban
Image: REX/Shutterstock

Few people have crushed more bright-eyed, entrepreneurial dreams than Mark Cuban.  

At first, that might sound like a rough assessment. After all, Cuban has invested a quarter of a billion dollars in bringing other people’s hopes to life. But, if Cuban’s rejection rate—which hovers right around 80% on ABC’s Shark Tank—teaches us anything, it’s a lesson profoundly contrary to popular wisdom. 

“They think,” Cuban said via email, “they can find a solution for any problem. Of course, I can. But everyone else. Not so much. :)” 

Joking aside, belief in our ideas and abilities is often regarded as the most valuable trait we can cultivate. After all, optimism isn’t just physically healthy, it also fuels passion, emboldens risk, and inspires courage. 

In his 2011 classic, Thinking, Fast and Slow, Nobel Prize-winner Daniel Kahneman called optimism the “engine of capitalism”: 

Optimistic individuals play a disproportionate role in shaping our lives. Their decisions make a difference; they are the inventors, the entrepreneurs, the political and military leaders — not average people.

And yet, for all its benefits, optimism has a dark side.  

“Most of us,” Kahneman continued, “view the world as more benign than it really is, our own attributes as more favorable than they truly are, and the goals we adopt as more achievable than they are likely to be.” 

From those assessments, two questions arise. First, what makes optimism so dangerous? And second, how do we foster healthy pessimism without losing hope? 

When half full goes all wrong 

To understand the danger of optimism, the first thing we have to come to grips with is: Fear.  

Humans are hardwired for threat detection. For the most part, our fight-or-flight impulse is a good thing. It’s what made our ancestors our ancestors

When it comes to decisionmaking, things get trickier. Psychologists call the phenomenon loss aversion: the universal drive to avoid risk even at the expense of equal or greater gain.  

Just how influential is this drive? Experiments by behavioral economists like Richard Thaler gauge the motivational sway between loss and gain at roughly two to one. “Losses,” in Thaler’s words, “hurt about twice as much as gains make you feel good.” 

Given our sensitivity, wouldn’t loss aversion keep us safe from optimism’s bias? Perhaps not.  

When I put the question to Kahneman directly, he explained: 

A combination of optimism and loss aversion is very common, causing people to take risks because they don’t acknowledge their existence. They take risks while feeling both confident and prudent.

Fear and optimism are two sides of the same coin. This is especially true in situations where not only the odds are against us, but control is too.  

Success demands a host of serendipitous events—the right development, timing, marketing, sales, supply, retention, and blunders from the competition. Rather than contemplate those requirements, we fall back on optimism’s mantra: “I think I can.” 

The result? Again, here’s Kahneman: 

Whenever you look at a great success you are likely to find an optimist. Optimists are great for the economy because their unreasonable risk-taking is an engine of innovation… On average, however, they are not particularly good for themselves. The fact that most or all successful people are optimists does not guarantee that all optimists are successful.

Compounding optimism’s danger is another bias: Survivor Selection. Success sells, which means if we only pay attention to the headlines, we’re likely to get a warped sense of how uncommon success truly is. For every magazine lionizing an outlier, countless bodies litter the same path. 

That’s why, when failure rears its head, we marvel and ask, “How could they be so stupid?” In truth, their stupidity stems from the very same place as our own. Not only do we overestimate our gifts, abilities, and insights, we chronically underestimate costs, timelines, and challenges.  

Why? Because loss aversion and survivor bias numb us to the realities of life. Just like any good pain killer, optimism soothes without treating the disease.  

What’s more, it can also turn on us. That’s what New York Times Bestseller Lewis Howes told me: 

Optimism can go south and turn into stress, anger, or frustration when the reality of my life doesn’t match up to the highlight reels I see around me on social media — especially if I’m struggling in an area where it seems like everyone around me is doing awesome.

At work, optimism can even have the opposite effect of its intention. “While it can inspire us to action,” Anthony Stephan, a principal at Deloitte, explains, “it also has the potential to unintentionally stifle the creative voices of others, which can limit your own opportunity for growth.” 

Strangely enough, Stephan goes on: 

What I had failed to realize was that with all the optimism I was trying to create, I was actually limiting the potential for ideas from others. Instead, the more positive and animated my words became, the less people were willing to share, out of fear that their ideas might not be received with the same enthusiasm I had for my own.

Don’t misunderstand; optimism can be a powerful force for good … right up to the point when it all goes wrong

The bright side of embracing the dark side 

If optimism fuels risk-taking and risk-taking drives innovation, then retaining optimism is essential. But so is tempering it.  

How? By embracing four habits. 

First, start planning your funeral. In the wake of any great failure, wise organizations conduct postmortems: business-focused autopsies that diagnose where things went wrong. 

Instead of waiting until it’s too late, analyze your demise before you begin. It’s a practice known as the premortem. After gathering stakeholders, ask your team, “A year has passed, and our project went down in flames. Why’d we fail?” Participants then talk through and record every possible cause of their foretold collapse.

You can take the same approach in your personal life as well. As Brad Stulberg explains in To Reach Your Goals, Imagine You Already Tried and Failed

It may seem like the negative thinking inherent to a premortem would work against self-belief and confidence. But if anything, it actually works toward it. When you force yourself to become aware of all that could go wrong, you become more likely to take the necessary steps to ensure that things go right.

The key is to divorce yourself from subjectivity and adopt an “outside” view. Dan Lovallo and Daniel Kahneman’s article Delusions of Success: How Optimism Undermines Executives’ Decisions offers detailed instructions — including a five-step formula — to do exactly that. 

The second way to cultivate healthy pessimism is by facing the numbers. Broadly speaking, fifty percent of new businesses survive past five years, and only one-third make a decade. Worse, for venture-backed startups, the failure rate is anywhere between seventy-five and ninety percent

On the personal side, a mere 4 percent to 7 percent of people quit smoking without medication or outside help: “Even experiencing a traumatic event — like the death of a loved one or being diagnosed with cancer — only leads to a 20% success rate.” Twenty-five percent of all New Year’s resolutions fail within the first two weeks. And we won’t even get into the failure rates of diet and exercise. 

But why flood yourself with negative numbers? 

“Many successful people,” writes Charles Duhigg, “spend an enormous amount of time seeking out information on failures. This, ultimately, is one of the most important secrets to learning how to make better decisions.” 

Third, know your limitations. “The optimism or pessimism choice is a forced choice; it’s a faulty assumption,” says Dr. Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence and the forthcoming book Altered Traits. “What you want is realistic optimism.”  

While at Harvard, Goleman and his colleges researched success in a surprisingly simple way:  

The test was a ring toss. Participants would take a little post and place it out as far away from them as they wanted. The further out they put it, the more points they’d get. It turned out that successful entrepreneurs — the business people who were going to last — were able to put the post pretty far out but still get the ring on. They knew what they could do. 

In other words, realistic optimists are people who know the game. They know what they bring to it, what their odds are, what’s possible, and they know the most they can do to still be successful. “That,” as Goleman put it, “is the best path to follow.” 

Lastly, and perhaps the best way to become a pessimist, isn’t to become one yourself. Entrepreneurs are natural optimists. In a very real sense, we have to be. The trouble comes from birds of a feather flocking together. Without getting intentional in our selection, we inevitably surround ourselves with people just like us: hopeful people, encouraging people, optimistic people.  

As strange as it sounds, that’s a recipe for disaster. 

“Behind every unbridled optimist,” says angel investor Joe Roos, “is a counterbalancing rationalist that ever so slightly varnishes the tint of the rose-colored glasses. It’s the delicate balance between blind ambition and rational thought that creates a dynamic environment conducive to innovation and growth.”  

Every optimist needs a pessimist to tell them when they’re naked. If your whole team is just as excited as you, something’s gone wrong.

Optimism and the Truth 

Going back to Cuban, his solutions echo the same principles: “Preparation, experience, and the never ending quest for more knowledge. More often than not, when I am pessimistic, it’s in areas that I haven’t had experience in or have chosen not to get involved with previously.”  

In the end, facing the truth about optimism doesn’t mean abandoning it.  

Rather, it means (1) envisioning all the possible ways your plan could fail, (2) staring long and hard at the odds against you, (3) knowing your limitations, and (4) sticking close to the people in your life who love you enough to be mean.  

So, here’s to the pessimists and all the dreams they crush. Because dreams stay dreams, until a pessimist drags them into the light. 

Aaron Orendorff is the founder of iconiContent and a regular contributor at Entrepreneur, Lifehacker, Fast Company, Business Insider and more. Connect with him about content marketing (and bunnies) on Facebook or Twitter.

Read more: http://mashable.com/2017/08/25/dark-side-of-optimism/

Facebook and Instagram get redesigns for readability

Taking inspiration from line drawings, Reddit and Messenger, Facebook is overhauling the design of the News Feed to make it more legible, clickable and commentable. Specifically, Facebook now makes it much clearer where threads start and end in comments. Meanwhile, Instagram today got a little redesign itself with comment reels now being threaded so you can have sub-conversations in public.

Facebook periodically updates its design, typically stripping out unnecessary “chrome,” or user interface framing, to create a sleeker, more readable look. There’s more and more white space on Facebook, which could be intended to reduce eye fatigue during long browsing sessions and let your friends’ content pop off the screen more vividly.

Facebook’s design team writes “we did not want to just ‘fiddle at the edges’, but rather make something that billions of people use every day less frustrating.”

Both the Facebook and Instagram changes will roll out to all iOS and Android users over the next few weeks.

Facebook comments

Facebook is adopting the Messenger bubble style for comments. This will make threading more obvious, but also encourage the rapid-fire conversations people typically have in private messages. Facebook has been trying to make comments feel more alive recently with fast-moving conversations becoming their own chat windows.

Navigation and like buttons

Facebook has made its navigation and feedback buttons bigger and easier to recognize with a new unfilled line drawing style. The News Feed, Video, Marketplace, Like, Comment and Share buttons now all feature this look. Meanwhile, Facebook is swapping the classic globe notifications icon for a more standard alerts bell. These could all be less distracting to the eye so you focus on Facebook’s content, not its chrome.

Other redesigns for legibility include higher contrast text that’s easier to see and circular profile photos that take up less space and feel more human. Link previews are now a little bigger, too, which could get more people clicking and sending referral traffic to other sites. However, Facebook says today’s changes shouldn’t impact the reach or traffic of Pages. The URL domain is now more prominent, appearing above the link’s headline, which could reduce the likelihood that users click fake/hoax sites that mimic popular news publisher URLs.

Knowing where you are

Facebook wants to make sure you don’t get lost several layers deep beyond the feed. Now you’ll see a more obvious header with a bigger black back button when you dive into a post from the News Feed. Facebook also says you’ll be able to “See where a link will take you before clicking on it,” though it already had link previews, blurbs and URLs, so we’ve asked for clarification here.

Design ethics

As Facebook and Instagram restyle themselves to boost usage, a question arises about design ethics. Is building a better mousetrap beneficial to society? Facebook and Instagram certainly allow communities and friend groups to grow their bonds, but when does fruitful exchange and sentimental entertainment give way to mindless scrolling?

As former Google design ethicist Tristan Harris discusses in his TED talk, over-optimization for engagement on social networks has created apps that are addictive to the point of being destructive.

Over the years I’ve repeatedly asked Facebook’s top executives like CPO Chris Cox and VP of News Feed Adam Mosseri about whether the company is doing research into how to prevent or minimize internet addiction that can stem from Facebook’s ad-driven business model, and I’ve never gotten a direct answer that indicates they think it’s a priority.

They do care about their users’ experience, with Cox telling me “We’re getting to a size where it’s worth really taking a careful look at what are all the things that we can do to make social media the most positive force for good possible.” But you can always have too much of a good thing.

The execs tell me Facebook wants to make sure all your time spent on its apps is “meaningful”. Yet at some point when people are sitting in the dark alone refreshing the feed over and over, it could be worth surfacing Internet addiction and mental health tips, or encouraging them to connect directly with a friend via messaging.

Perhaps one day our apps will be redesigned not just to soak up more attention, but to warn us when we’re neglecting everything else.

Read more: https://techcrunch.com/2017/08/15/facebook-instagram-comments/

Intel CEO Becomes Third Chief to Quit Trump Council After Riots

Intel Corp.’s Brian Krzanich joined Under Armour Inc.’s Kevin Plank in becoming the latest chief executives to quit President Donald Trump’s council of U.S. business leaders, as membership on the panel has become enmeshed in the country’s volatile politics after violent riots in Virginia over the weekend.

The moves come hours after Merck & Co.’s Kenneth Frazier first stepped down from the business council. Plank’s departure is a particularly sharp rebuke to Trump, after the Under Armour executive earlier this year came under fire for commenting that the president was a “real asset” for the country.

"I resigned to call attention to the serious harm our divided political climate is causing to critical issues, including the serious need to address the decline of American manufacturing," Intel’s Krzanich said in a company blog post.

Plank said in a tweeted statement that “Under Armour engages in innovation and sport, not politics,” while Merck’s Frazier said he quit “as a matter of personal conscience, I feel a responsibility to take a stand against intolerance and extremism.” 

Trump responded to Frazier with a couple jabs, tweeting late Monday that “@Merck Pharma is a leader in higher & higher drug prices while at the same time taking jobs out of the U.S.”

Over the weekend, one woman was killed and many others were injured after a man in a car rammed a group of counter-demonstrators during a daylong melee in Charlottesville, Virginia. White supremacists and other hate groups had massed in the city to protest the removal of a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee.

Trump was widely criticized by U.S. lawmakers and other officials for not denouncing white supremacists in a statement on Saturday in which he said “many sides” were at fault for the violence. The president has repeatedly drawn fire for his relations with white nationalist groups and his handling of issues related to minorities.

Speaking from the White House on Monday, Trump denounced white supremacists and declared racism “evil.”

“To anyone who acted criminally in this weekend’s racist violence, you will be held accountable,” Trump said, calling for unity in the wake of the tragedy.

The CEO departures show how corporate leaders are walking a narrow line in working with the Trump administration to help shape policy around taxes, immigration and other issues, while trying not to alienate customers in an increasingly tense political environment.

Plank’s pro-Trump commentary earlier this year sparked an uproar from shoppers and very public dissent among Under Armour’s athletes, including his most-valued sneaker pitchman, basketball star Stephen Curry. The CEO in a television interview had declared that Trump is “pro-business” and a “real asset.”

After a Wall Street analyst downgraded the company, Plank took out a full-page newspaper ad, saying his words praising Trump “did not accurately reflect” his intent. He said the company opposed the president’s executive order to ban refugees from certain countries.

The president’s council has included top executives from Boeing Co., Dow Chemical Co. and Johnson & Johnson. A handful of CEOs have stepped down from two White House business groups, which have met only sporadically, over political controversies.

The president hasn’t been shy about calling out businesses for perceived missteps. After his 2016 election victory Trump took aim at defense contractors Boeing and Lockheed Martin Corp. for what he called the high cost of some aircraft, and muscled United Technologies Corp. unit Carrier into keeping a plant in Indiana after the company said it would be closed and production shifted to Mexico. 

Corporate Pushback

Trump created two CEO advisory groups early in his presidency. Blackstone Group CEO Steve Schwarzman leads one described as a strategy and policy forum, and Dow Chemical’s Andrew Liveris organized a manufacturing initiative. After an initial burst of activity and press attention, the councils have fizzled with neither meeting since April.

Earlier this year, Elon Musk of Tesla Inc. and Walt Disney Co. CEO Bob Iger quit the strategy and policy panel after Trump said he would withdraw from the Paris climate pact. Former Uber Technologies Inc. CEO Travis Kalanick quit in February after Trump’s executive order on immigration.

Trump and a range of corporations have previously been at odds on other fronts.

The administration drew criticism from a wide swath of companies over its executive order restricting immigration. More than 160 technology firms, including Amazon.com Inc., Facebook Inc., and Google corporate parent Alphabet Inc. joined a legal brief criticizing the order. Technology firms have also criticized the administration’s efforts to restrict access to H-1B visas for high-skilled workers, and eliminate an Obama Administration program that would have provided visas for foreign entrepreneurs who received startup funding.

Other members of the Trump councils, including Lockheed Martin and PepsiCo Inc., declined to say whether they would follow the moves of the other executives in stepping down.

Merck’s Prices

Merck has in the past taken stands on social issues. In 2012, the company’s foundation ended funding for the Boy Scouts of America over the group’s exclusion of gays from its leadership ranks. Frazier is a registered Democrat, according to Pennsylvania voter records.

Trump made U.S. drug prices an issue during the presidential campaign and after — at one point accusing drug companies of “getting away with murder.” While his rhetoric on the subject has cooled, the Food and Drug Administration has taken steps to try and bring more competition to the market for some drugs, and speed more generic drugs to the market.

Frazier, in December, said his company has a “restrained” approach to price increases, calling aggressive price increases a foolhardy move by the industry. In a company report published this year, Merck said it has a “long history of making our medicines and vaccines accessible and affordable through responsible pricing practices.”

For 2016, the list price on its drugs rose by 9.6 percent on average while the net price, which more closely reflects what is paid by consumers, rose 5.5 percent, according to the report.

Merck shares were up 0.7 percent to $62.79 at 12:02 p.m. in New York, roughly in line with a broader advance in the U.S. stock market.

Toby Cosgrove, the CEO of the Cleveland Clinic, plans to remain on the strategy and policy group, said Eileen Sheil, a spokeswoman for the health system. She said the group hasn’t met since April, and there are no meetings scheduled.

Goldman Sachs Group Inc. CEO Lloyd Blankfein also took to Twitter Monday in response to the violence, citing former president Abraham Lincoln. “A house divided against itself cannot stand,” wrote Blankfein, whose inaugural tweet in June expressed disapproval over Trump’s decision to ditch the Paris climate accord.

    Read more: http://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-08-14/merck-ceo-quits-trump-council-as-matter-of-personal-conscience

    Zodiac Signs Ranked By How Long They Take To Get Over A Breakup

    Bewakoof.com Official

    1. Leo

    Leos definitely get over a breakup the fastest. It’s simply not in your nature to let yourself wallow for long. You’re definitely very loving and warm in your relationships, but as soon as something ends, you’re less focused on rehashing what went wrong and more focused on doing what you can to continue improving and taking care of yourself. So rather than laying on the couch and throwing a pity party, you’re out hanging with friends, taking a class in something you love, taking on extra responsibilities at work, etc.

    2. Sagittarius

    It is simply unlike a Sagittarius to be downhearted and crestfallen for long. You certainly give yourself space to grieve and you make an effort not to be overly optimistic about how soon you think you’ll move on. But as the weeks go by, you have no problem doing things to cheer yourself up and help speed up the breakup process – like going on a fun vacation with your friends, treating yourself to a spa day, making frequent dinner plans, etc.

    3. Aries

    An Aries is not brokenhearted for long – and this is mostly because you don’t give yourself the time. When you’re sad and disheartened, you just keep yourself constantly moving for fear that if you sit still for too long, you’ll never want to get out of bed. So in the midst of a breakup you are constantly out and about, seeing and doing everything, so that your heart has no choice but to adapt and adjust.

    4. Pisces

    A brokenhearted Pisces is open about being brokenhearted. And this is what helps you to move on faster. You’re so sensitive and compassionate, even with yourself, that it’s impossible for you to ignore your own feelings. So you typically just spend a lot of time talking about your relationship with people you trust, and getting your feelings off of your chest, so that your heart has enough relief and space to start putting itself back together.

    5. Capricorn

    When it comes to moving on, a Capricorn is as methodical and practical as they come. You’re smart enough to know that you have to acknowledge your own sadness and look it in the face, but instead of being overwhelmed or unsure of what to do next, you just always focus on the ‘next step’ of getting over that person – you give yourself the appropriate amount of time you think you need to grieve, you focus on the things you can control, you unfollow them or hide them on social media if that helps, etc.

    6. Cancer

    You would think that a Cancer would be one of the signs that takes the absolute longest amount of time possible to move on, but it’s not nearly that bad. Sure, you wear your heart on your sleeve and you feel things very deeply – and while that can make your breakup very painful, it can actually make it healthier and more productive, too. You refuse to hide your heartbreak and you’re honest with people about how devastated you are, but because of this, you are able to address your feelings faster and learn what helps you and what doesn’t. So it does take you some time to grieve and heal, but not nearly as much time as you might initially assume.

    7. Libra

    A Libra’s biggest struggle during a breakup is feeling lost. You don’t know exactly what you need – would it make you feel better to be alone or to be around people? Are you sure you did the right thing? What if this breakup was a bad idea? Should you call them? What if they’re already over you? You get caught up in too many uncertainties instead of just committing to the breakup and letting yourself move on in whatever way works best for you.

    8. Virgo

    A Virgo is their own biggest enemy when it comes to moving on. This is mostly because you convince yourself that the breakup was entirely your fault, that if it couldn’t work with this person it’s never going to work with anyone else, and maybe you should just start getting used to being alone – etc, etc, etc. You never let yourself just shut your brain off and give your soul some quiet time to rest. You’re just constantly overthinking about what you could have done differently and how you’ll probably be this sad forever and a million other problems – which makes it practically impossible for you to get over them.

    9. Gemini

    A brokenhearted Gemini is a ticking time bomb. You feel the need to convince everyone else that you are okay, and you spend all of your energy trying to show them – even though, internally, you are completely shattered and devastated. The reason it takes so damn long for you to get over them is because you keep getting in your own way, spending all your time trying to put on a brave face instead of working on your emotional health.

    10. Aquarius

    An Aquarius feels heartbreak just as much as the next person but doesn’t ‘realize’ it. Meaning that instead of acknowledging that you are in pain, you do whatever you can to ignore it, to distract yourself, and to put off dealing with the breakup for as long as you can. This seems to work in the beginning and you often seem like the one who’s ‘winning’ the breakup, but it just ends up screwing you over long term – because your hurt and pain just build and build and build until finally it’s so bad and it’s taken so long for you to feel better that you have no choice but to finally work through the breakup.

    11. Scorpio

    When it comes to moving on, a Scorpio is just terrible. Understandably, going through a breakup makes you feel totally outside of yourself and lost in your own world. But instead of dealing with it by leaning on others and looking your pain in the face, you end up making a lot of rash and reckless decisions, closing yourself off, convincing yourself that your pain is something to be ashamed about, not talking to anyone about it, etc. These are all of your attempts to protect yourself, but all it does is make the ‘moving on’ process of your breakup practically impossible until you start making different decisions.

    12. Taurus

    A Taurus is no stranger to intense emotions – it’s the what you’re supposed to do with the negative emotions that really throws you. You absolutely love being in a relationship – you love the companionship, the blending of worlds, the connection. So when that gets pulled out from under you, all you can think about is how great everything used to be, instead of focusing on the future like you need to. You take the absolute longest to move on from a breakup because you don’t know how to let go of your partner or your pain; all you want is for things to just go back to the way they were, and this coping mechanism of wanting to live in the past just completely holds you back.

    Read more: https://thoughtcatalog.com/kim-quindlen/2017/08/zodiac-signs-ranked-by-how-long-they-take-to-get-over-a-breakup/